Pathfindersonline

Networking ideas for Pathfinder Ministry
It is currently Fri Aug 23, 2019 10:33 pm

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 6:56 pm 
Offline
New Friend

Joined: Sat Sep 10, 2011 6:25 am
Posts: 5
Hi!
I'm looking for some resources for the Explorer class for the Spiritual Discovery #4 requirement. I've tried an internet search for Adventist missionaries for 1900-1950 with no luck. If I just do a general search for Adventist missionaries I only get current missionaries. Can anyone tell me where to look or give me eight missionaries that served during this time? Thanks!!

Nicole Wall


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jan 30, 2012 9:15 pm 
Offline
Master Guide
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2005 1:29 pm
Posts: 1168
Location: Central New Hampshire
Look for the Hall of Faith series. There are several, including

Harry Miller
Leo and Jessie Halliwell
Eric B Hare.
Alfred & Betty Cott
O.E. Davis
Ana & Fernando Stahl.

Also search for Norma Youngberg. She was not only a missionary, but she wrote several books about other missionaries during that time frame - and hers are some of the best Adventist stories you will ever read.

_________________
Jim Thomas
The sooner you get behind, the more time you have to catch up.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 2:40 am 
Offline
Helpful Explorer
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 4:12 am
Posts: 71
Location: Invercargill - New Zealand
It is a pity they narrowed the expansion dates 1900-1950. What is now known as The South Pacific Division was entered 1885 by people with names John Tay sailed on the ship Pitcairn (the fist Sabbath school mission offering in USA paid for it) went to most Islands in the Pacific 1891. Stephen Haskell led a delegation of missionaries to Australia and Nerw Zealand 1885. Islands of Papua New Guinea, Tahiti, Tonga, Samoa, Fiji; to list a few.

_________________
Geoff H
Invercargill Club Director
Master Guide, PLA
Fiordland wanderer
Invercargill
Home of the Fastest Indian


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 2:41 am 
Offline
Helpful Explorer
User avatar

Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 4:12 am
Posts: 71
Location: Invercargill - New Zealand
I will have to dig out the good missionary story books and check them out

_________________
Geoff H
Invercargill Club Director
Master Guide, PLA
Fiordland wanderer
Invercargill
Home of the Fastest Indian


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2013 8:48 pm 
Offline
Participating Companion
User avatar

Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2009 1:04 pm
Posts: 42
Location: Austin, Texas
As we were researching, we came across several resources, though through round-about ways. Some are listed below.

Some Resources:
* A Brief History of Seventh-day Adventists, by George R Knight
* Tell it to the World; The Story of Seventh-day Adventists, by C. Mervyn Maxwell
* The Great Second Advent Movement; Its Rise and Progress, by J.N. Loughborough
* Church Heritage, prepared by the Youth Department, General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Also check AdventSource for additional books and resources.
* Playing Our Past, by the Canadian Union College Heritage Players, available online at
http://www.adventistheritage.org/article.php?id=68
* Historical Prologue to Early Writings by Ellen G. White, available online at http://www.gilead.net/egw/books2/earlyw ... istory.htm
* Pioneer Gallery and Biographical Sketches from Adventist Pioneer Library, available online at
http://www.aplib.org/Gallery.htm
* Lest We Forget periodical by Adventist Pioneer Library, available online at
http://www.aplib.org/Periodical.htm

Other online sources (search for the title) include the Historical Dictionary of Seventh-day Adventists, One-Hundred Years of Adventism in Russia and the Soviet Union, The Register of the Jacob Nelson Anderson Collection at Union College, Courage in the Lord - The Story of Albert Henry Piper, A Late Expansion - Early Adventism in Kiribati and Tuvalu, Origin and History of Seventh-day Adventists - Volume 4, The 1952 Yearbook of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination, Church Heritage - A Course in Church History, and A Brief History of Seventh-Day Adventists.

The 1900-1950 time period does miss many of the early missionaries, and much of the South Pacific, but it is a fairly unique and robust time of Missionary growth (and in part inspired by the Pacific missionary movement). Between 1900 and 1950, the great expansion of Adventist overseas mission work, 6,637 missionaries were sent out around the world (There is a great chart for this in hte 1952 Yearbook of the Seventh-day Adventist Denomination, as well as a good chart from Knight's A Brief History of Seventh-day Adventists).

A. G. Daniels, the General Conference President from 1901-1922, had a strong vision for mission. While earlier the Union President in Australia, he helped develop the mission field in the South Pacific. William A. Spicer served as Secretary of the General Conference while Daniels was President, and then served as President from 1922-1930. Like Daniels, he had a strong passion for the mission field. He had previously served as secretary of the Mission Board, and from 1900-1940, Spicer was reported to have traveled overseas at least once every year but four.

Some Adventist missionaries from the 1900-1950 expansion (once you have a name and country, it is easier to search for them):

RUSSIA: Due to political restrictions by the Tzar, many Adventists in Russia moved to Siberia in the 1890s. In 1908, K. A. Reifschneider, a German pastor from Pyatigorsk in the Caucasus, arrived in Siberia to minister. He established a base of operations in Omsk, and traveled by sleigh across Siberia.

CENTRAL AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN: W.A. Sweany traveled to the Bahamas as a full- time missionary in 1909, establishing the first church at Nassau in 1911. In 1915, John L. Brown traveled to El Salvador, initially selling books, but in 1916 he led his first public meetings, resulting in 14 baptisms and the establishment of a church in San Salvador.

MIDDLE EAST: The first Adventist missionaries to Persia were F. F. Oster and Henry Dirksen, arriving in 1911 and joined by Mrs. Oster in 1913. German missionaries O. Staubert and his wife met up with them in 1913, but because they were German citizens, they were forced to flee in 1914 during World War I. The Stauberts were separated, and could not find one another for a full year, when they were reunited in Germany. Prior to the war, Oster had also taken the message by horseback to Turkestan.

NORTHEAST ASIA: Early Adventist missionaries to China included Edwin H. Wilbur & his wife, who arrived in December 1902 and Danish-born Jacob Nelson Anderson and his first wife, Emma Thompson Anderson, who, along with their three children, served in China from 1902-1909. In 1904, Timothy Tay, a Chinese baptized in Singapore, became the first native Chinese missionary to enter China. In 1908, Dr. Riley Russell began the medical missionary work in Korea, and established the Soonan Dispensary Hospital. F. A. Allum and his wife and children, along with M. C. Warren and his wife and daughter, traveled by houseboat to Sichuan and Congqing China in 1914 to open the mission field there.

SOUTHEAST ASIA: The first Adventist missionaries to Southeast Asia were Ralph Minson and his wife, who arrived in Sumatra in January 1900. In 1905, R. A. Caldwell arrived in the Philippines. Fred L. Picket was the first Adventist missionary to enter Cambodia, in 1930. He was not allowed to build a church there, so he built one at Tinh Bien in neighboring Cochin China for his Cambodian converts.

PACIFIC ISLANDS: The first Adventist mission in Papua New Guinea was established by Septimus W. Carr and Peni Tavodi, a Fijian teacher, in 1908. In 1924, R. H. Tutty, along with Nano and Rongapitu, from the Solomon Islands, were first Adventist missionaries to Bougainville (one of the islands of New Guinea). Albert Henry Piper and his wife Hester Elizabeth Newcombe, called Hettie by her friends, were the first Australasia Adventist missionaries into the Pacific Islands, heading to Rarotonga in 1900. John Howse and his family traveled to Kiribati and Tuvalu Islands, via Fiji, in 1947. These islands were reached late among others in the Pacific by the Adventist message, and the work was difficult.

AFRICA: F. B. Armitage and his wife traveled 150 miles from the Solusi mission in South Africa to establish the Somabula Mission in 1901. During their first Sabbath at the new mission, they prayed for God to help them find someone seeking the truth. Outside their door, a native boy arrived, who told them he had had a dream that their house was where he could learn about the words of the true God. He asked them to share, and they were happy to do so. Two years after establishing the mission, they held their first baptisms. In 1906, A. A. Carscallen, from England, along with J. D. Baker and B. L. Morse, began Adventist mission work in British East Africa, establishing their main base of operations at Gendia, Kisumu, Kenya. Dr. F. W. Vasenius and V. E. Toppenberg arrived in Africa in 1909 to establish the first Adventist mission for Ethiopians. In 1921, Toppenberg was able to enter Ethiopia itself, and established a mission near Addis Ababa. D. E. Delhove expanded the Adventist mission into Dutch East Africa in 1919. World War I saw many Germans held prisoner by the British in East Africa, including many Seventh-day Adventists. The Danish missionary V. E. Toppenberg remained in the area until 1917, but after two years in America, he traveled to Ethiopia to take the Adventist message there. In 1935 A. F. Raposo brought the Adventist message to Cape Verde, baptizing 15 people in 1936.

SOUTH AMERICA: Ferdinand Anthony Stahl and his wife Anna traveled as missionaries to LaPaz, Bolivia in 1909. In 1911 they moved to the other side of Lake Titicaca in Peru, taking the Adventist message to the Aymara and Quechua Indians. The Stahls established several schools, teaching the indians to read and write. In 1920, the Stahls relocated to the headwaters of the Amazon, establishing the Metraro Mission Station and using a steam launch to travel the rivers. In 1929 Elder and Mrs. L. B. Halliwell were called to the the mission field in Northern Brazil, along the Amazon River. In order to reach the peoples, the Halliwells decided to use home-visits and medical missions, and called on the young people of North America to raise funds for a motor launch. The $4000 was raised by 1931, and the Luzeiro (Light Bearer), a 30 foot long 10 foot wide diesel-powered motor launch entered service.

_________________
--
Rodger Baker
Area Coordinator
Central Texas Pathfinders
[url]ctxpathfinders.org[/url]

"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."
-John Muir


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group