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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 10:57 am 
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Location: Alberta, Canada
If you are teaching the "Basic Rescue" or "Knots" honor, here is a knot that I think some may find interesting for Requirement 10C. "Tie knots for use around a person for a rescue".

When I was younger I was a volunteer with the Canadian Ski Patrol System, and they taught a knot that was to be used for self rescue from a chair lift if needed. The thought was if the chair lift were to stop operating, and the ski patrol had to evacuate the lift, they would need to first be able to get on the ground themselves.

I have used this knot, in training, to exit a chair lift. I don't see this knot in a lot of other places I look so I thought I'd share it here in the forum. In the image it is called "Double Strand Bowline", and in the text, "Triple Loop Bowline".

Image

(Paraphrased instructions)

Rope Sling (Triple-Loop Bowline):

A sling can be made using rope. To do so:

a) double the end of the rope for a length of 2.5 metres for a 2metre tall person of average weight. Practice with different sized individuals will aid you in determining the proper length (approximately 0.6 metres longer than the individual's height);

b) make a bowline with the doubled rope just as though you were making a regular bowline with a single rope;

c) note that three loops are formed - 2 together (leg loops) and the single loop (chest loop) at the end;

d) adjust the loops to be of approximately equal size. The single loop may be smaller that the leg loops. This will result in the knot being higher on the chest;

e) tie a clove hitch with the loose single rope as a safety precaution;

f) to use the rope sling: slip one loop over each leg and draw well up into the crotch. Slip one arm and the head through the remaining third loop so that the rope crosses over the chest diagonally. The knot should be centrally located;


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:05 am 
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Master Guide
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Location: Central New Hampshire
That is a slick knot! I'll add it to my repertoire. At a glance, it is similar to the bowline-on-a-bight, but it's certainly not the same. It looks a lot easier to tie too.

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Jim Thomas
The sooner you get behind, the more time you have to catch up.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:07 am 
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Master Guide
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Location: Carolina Conference, Southern Union Conference, NAD
I love this knot.

However, because of the rope that we use on my fire department, the bowline is not a safe knot, as it doesn't hold/ slips more readily. What ever you do, make sure that the type of rope you use holds the knots you need well.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:18 am 
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Location: Central New Hampshire
What kind of rope does your FD use? Curious!

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Jim Thomas
The sooner you get behind, the more time you have to catch up.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 3:56 pm 
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Location: Carolina Conference, Southern Union Conference, NAD
I think that it is polypropylene rope. I may be wrong about that. I know it's synthetic and starts with a "P."


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 4:20 pm 
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Location: Central New Hampshire
Gah! I hate polypropylene rope. There are very few knots that won't slip with that stuff. The only redeeming qualities it has is that it floats (nice for boating applications) and it is fairly strong. I don't think it's any stronger than nylon though, and it doesn't much matter how strong it is if none of my favorite knots will stay tied.

I should probably quit complaining about polyprop and just learn what knots it will take.

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Jim Thomas
The sooner you get behind, the more time you have to catch up.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 5:20 pm 
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Master Guide
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Location: Carolina Conference, Southern Union Conference, NAD
It's great for rescue procedures. Technically, a bowline will slip more easily with any form of synthetic rope. But, polypropylene is by fare the worst.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2014 2:04 pm 
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Helpful Explorer
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Location: Invercargill - New Zealand
This knot is actually a bowline on a bite. The same as Desmond Doss used in WW2.

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