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 Post subject: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:47 pm 
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Hey everyone,

I was just thinking how cool it would be if there were a Firefighting honor in the Vocational series. I can think of several requirements right off the top of my head, but I know there are at least three fire fighters on this forum (if I'm counting correctly) who could add TONS more to this. Let's not add tons though - better to subtract a few requirements and tune others up, and maybe come up with an advanced honor as well. Here's what I've got so far:

Skill Level 1
1. Have the Red Alert Honor
2. Tour a fire station or invite a firefighter to give a talk to your club.
3. Organize and conduct a fire drill in a public building
4. Know how to use a fire extinguisher
5. Explain the different types of fire extinguishers and know the types of fires against which they can or cannot be used.
6. Perform a fire safety Inspection in your church and present your findings to the Church Board. Help implement any recommendations. (OK, the church is probably inspected by the department for real, but I still think this is a good idea).
7. Inspect all the fire extinguishers in a public building (minimum square footage?)
8. Memorize the Bible verse in Rider's signature...

Maybe this should be Skill Level 2 instead of one - so far it seems more like Fire Safety than Firefighting. Let's crank it up a notch...

9. Discuss the role of a firefighter as it relates to Sabbath keeping.
10. What training must a person receive to become a (certified?) firefighter in your community.
11. List the protective gear used by firefighters and describe the function of each.
12. Describe the following firefighting tools and understand their proper use:
a. ???
b. ???
13. Understand the function of the following fire vehicles
a. Pumper
b. Ladder Truck
c. Wagon
d. Engine
e. ???

Discuss!

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 4:49 pm 
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I think that is a very interesting idea Jim. The first section sounds like it might be more aptly named fire safety or fire awareness, but the second half is very aptly named. I like the idea, though.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 5:00 pm 
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I thought about adding the CPR honor as a prerequisite too, but I'd really like it if this could be kept at skill level 1. It might have to bump up to two. We could propose an advanced honor too.

With a lot of the vocational honors, once earned the Pathfinder is not necessarily qualified to work in that field - it's more of an introduction. I would think that the first half of this one might be appropriate. It's a level up from Red Alert, and I don't know of another honor that teaches the things listed.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 3:40 am 
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There is a Fire Station a block from my house. I can find out some of the answers, and maybe find out what other questions we should include.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 3:44 am 
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By the way, for question #8. Memorize the Bible verse in Rider's signature... are you planning to give a hint as to where to find that? :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 6:09 am 
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Hi Betsy,

The hint is that it's Rider's sig on this forum. All his posts have it. But to spare you all from having to dig it up, here's the verse:
Quote:
When you pass through the waters,
I will be with you;
and when you pass through the rivers,
they will not sweep over you.
When you walk through the fire,
you will not be burned;
the flames will not set you ablaze. Isa 43:2 (NIV)

Which reminds me... firefighters are often called upon to do river rescues...

Our conference associate director is also a firefighter, so I could bounce this off him (and probably get him to teach it to several clubs in the conference in order to pilot it). But I do welcome and solicit feedback from the members of this forum. There is wisdom in many counselors!

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:04 am 
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jomegat,

I know his signature. I was talking about for those that do not visit the forum.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 8:08 am 
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Oh! Yeah. I didn't know which verse it was, so when I was writing all this up, I cited it that way - because I was talking to this audience. In a for-real list of requirements it would absolutely have to call out the scripture. After all, we can't make "Rider" a permanent part of a Pathfinder honor requirement!

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Apr 23, 2009 8:34 am 
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LOL. Maybe that would be a good idea for people to join or at least visit the forum to find out. :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 4:03 pm 
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I agree that it should probably be called fire safety awareness (or something like that), not firefighting as that is actually an occupation and would require, in my opinion, knowledge and skills in that profession. ON that same note it seems that what you have proposed for the advanced seems to come closer to this requirement as you have asked for them to list requirements... I will try to sit down and write answers and either send them to you or post them to what you have written thus far. I definitely believe that it is a good idea though... and should be continued to be perused....

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 7:46 pm 
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I am retired from theOregon Forestry and worked on Forest Fires for 30 years. It appears your honor is based on structural fires not wildland fires, If you want to expand your honor to include forest fires I could help. There are many seasonal job available for young people 18+ in forest fire fighting.
Rod Bardell
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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 8:33 pm 
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Rod, I'd LOVE it if you would expand on this. I hadn't even considered non-structural fires. It might be a good idea to repost all the requirements with your edits. Feel free to axe any requirements I've proposed, or morph them into anything you see fit, or add totally new ones. Anything goes as far as I'm concerned.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 11:48 am 
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How about making two separate honors. I have included some activities, instead of all bookwork. I acually developed and taught a forestry class at Oregon's Milo Academy with one chapter on fires.

Fire Safety Honor Level 1
  1. Have the Red Alert Honor.
  2. Tour a fire station or invite a firefighter to give a talk to your club or school.
  3. Organize and conduct a fire drill at your school. Develop exit maps if needed.
  4. Explain the different types of fire extinguishers and know the types of fires against which they can or cannot be used.
  5. Inspect a minimum of five fire extinguishers in your school, church or other public building.
  6. Know how to use a fire extinguisher.
  7. Perform a fire safety Inspection in your church or school and present your findings to the Church or School Board. Help implement any recommendations.
  8. What precautions must you take before starting a campfire or debris burn?
  9. Memorize the following Bible verses: Isaiah 43:2 and James 3:5,6

Firefighting Honor Level II
  1. Have the Fire Safety Honor.
  2. What are the elements of a fire triangle?
  3. What three factors influence a wildland fire? Observe fire behavior experiments demonstrating how variables such as fuel size, fuel moisture, wind and slope influence fire spread.
  4. What training must a person receive to become a certified firefighter in your community.
  5. List the protective gear used by firefighters and describe the function of each.
  6. Describe and know the proper use of firefighting tools used in:
    1. Structural fires
    2. Wildland fires
  7. Have an instructor demonstrate the safe use of wildland hand tools. As a unit or club construct a fire trail. This trail could also be used as a recreational trail.
  8. Understand the function of the following fire equipment:
    1. Pumper
    2. Ladder Truck
    3. Wagon
    4. Engine
    5. Helicopter
    6. Retardant planes
    7. Bulldozer
  9. List the 10 Standard Firefighting Orders.
  10. Discuss the role of a firefighter as it relates to Sabbath keeping.


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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 12:27 pm 
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I like this a lot!

For Fire Safety, req 6, how about DEMONSTRATE how to use an extinguisher rather than "know" how to. That's more hands on, and I think a more effective learning tool.

For this requirement
Quote:
7. Have an instructor demonstrate the safe use of wildland hand tools. As a unit or club construct a fire trail. This trail could also be used as a recreational trail.

would we want an alternate way to meet the requirement? My objection to not having an alternate requirement for this is that it could easily put the honor out of reach for urban PF's. With that in mind, I'd think the alternate would have an urban slant. But it should represent a activity requiring equal effort.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 6:08 pm 
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Mt. Home Trees wrote:
How about making two separate honors. I have included some activities, instead of all bookwork. I acually developed and taught a forestry class at Oregon's Milo Academy with one chapter on fires.

Fire Safety Honor Level 1
  1. Have the Red Alert Honor.
  2. Tour a fire station or invite a firefighter to give a talk to your club or school.
  3. Organize and conduct a fire drill at your school. Develop exit maps if needed.
  4. Explain the different types of fire extinguishers and know the types of fires against which they can or cannot be used.
  5. Inspect a minimum of five fire extinguishers in your school, church or other public building.
  6. Know how to use a fire extinguisher.
  7. Perform a fire safety Inspection in your church or school and present your findings to the Church or School Board. Help implement any recommendations.
  8. What precautions must you take before starting a campfire or debris burn?
  9. Memorize the following Bible verses: Isaiah 43:2 and James 3:5,6

Firefighting Honor Level II
  1. Have the Fire Safety Honor.
  2. What are the elements of a fire triangle?
  3. What three factors influence a wildland fire? Observe fire behavior experiments demonstrating how variables such as fuel size, fuel moisture, wind and slope influence fire spread.
  4. What training must a person receive to become a certified firefighter in your community.
  5. List the protective gear used by firefighters and describe the function of each.
  6. Describe and know the proper use of firefighting tools used in:
    1. Structural fires
    2. Wildland fires
  7. Have an instructor demonstrate the safe use of wildland hand tools. As a unit or club construct a fire trail. This trail could also be used as a recreational trail.
  8. Understand the function of the following fire equipment:
    1. Pumper
    2. Ladder Truck
    3. Wagon
    4. Engine
    5. Helicopter
    6. Retardant planes
    7. Bulldozer
  9. List the 10 Standard Firefighting Orders.
  10. Discuss the role of a firefighter as it relates to Sabbath keeping.


For the first honor:
I would like to modify the extinguisher requirement. Instead of different types of extinguishers, how about types of fires (A, B, C, D, & K) and what extinguishers to use for each type. I know that this modification is just switching the words around to some degree, but it makes much more sense to me that way.

I would also like to point out that a house inspection would greatly differ from a church or school inspection. You might want to inspect part of the church and then part of a house.

For the second honor:
2- There are differences between the wildland & structural fire triangles. I realize that the next requirement deals more with the wildland triangle, but let me define both right now.
The structural fire triangle is made up of:
    - fuel
    - heat
    - oxygen
The wildland fire triangle is made up of:
    - fuel
    - weather
    - topography
(Source: Firefighter's Handbook 3rd Edition. Delmar/Cengage Learning.)

3- Split it into two parts, the first part about wildland fires and the second part about structural fires. Keep what is already written in number 3 for the wildland fire part. For the structural fire part, add building construction (ie. Wood, steel, concrete, masonry, & composites. Explain how each material relates to fires). Don't get into much detail beyond what happens to each as it comes in contact with heat/fire.

5- Gear between firefighters varies depending on whether you are a structural firefighter, wildland firefighter, or proximity firefighter (airport firefighting).


That's all of the notes I have for now. I'm shamed to admit that I forgot about wildland firefighting. I also know very little about proximity firefighting, so I cannot add much about it other than personal protective equipment. All of my source material is either from learned habits, the Delmar/Cengage Learning book, or the "Tennessee Commission on Fire Fighting: Fire Fighter 1 Practical Evaluation, 2002 Edition of NFPA 1001 Standard."

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 7:24 pm 
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Actually the fire triangle is the same for structural and wildland fires: fuel, heat & oxygen. Fuels, weather and topography are the three factors which influence wildland fire spread. Rod


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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Fri Jul 10, 2009 10:03 pm 
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It would be benifical to demostrate by dvd/ youtube or similar the fast spread of fire. Training sesons at a fire station would have this. At a fire station they may even get hands on experiece using extinguishers on diesel fire. Also just knowing how to opperate an extinguisher is diferent to knowing how to put out a fire in a building using an extinguisher. And the safety aspect of flashback and keeping the way of retreat always open and how soon the extinguisher actuallly runs out. I recently did training at the fire station for a building warden certificate and the fire I was putting out using CO2 did not go out, the fire was too big and the extingisher ran out.
Part of a requirment could br to assist in putting out a camp cooking fire.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2009 11:29 am 
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I would be greatly pleased of some of you who are fire fighters would pick up this ball and run with it. Rewrite the requirements, present them to your conference PF director, and have three clubs pilot the honor (I would be happy to pilot it). Then have your conference youth director present it to the Division (NAD or SPD, but really, I don't know how the SPD approves new honors. This is how it's done in the NAD though).

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:33 pm 
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harv4 wrote:
It would be benifical to demostrate by dvd/ youtube or similar the fast spread of fire.
The spread of a fire depends on the fuel that it is feeding off of. You might need to show several different types of fuels (wood/brush/undergrowth- forest fires; lumber/carpet/clothing- house fires; several different fuels- car/industrial fires).
harv4 wrote:
Training sessions at a fire station would have this. At a fire station they may even get hands on experiece using extinguishers on diesel fire. Also just knowing how to opperate an extinguisher is diferent to knowing how to put out a fire using an extinguisher.
This is a very good suggestion. It may not even have to be a fire department any public safety agency would work. [quote='harv4"]And the safety aspect of flashback and keeping the way of retreat always open and how soon the extinguisher actually runs out.[/quote] Did you mean flashover? If so, I don't think I would worry too much about that other than to briefly explain what it is. If somebody is dealing with a flashover, they had better be with a proper fire agency, in full protective gear, and have lots of back-up before trying to deal with that kind of situation. As for the clear exit route, I totally agree. The rule that I always use (when armed only with an extinguisher and not a hose, pumper, and protective equipment) is that if the extinguisher doesn't put out the fire, then it is best to leave the structure and report that fact to emergency personnel. It wouldn't hurt to mention how much the extinguisher was rated for though.
harv4 wrote:
Part of a requirment could br to assist in putting out a camp cooking fire.
I think that a trash fire would be a better choice. Pathfinder's are taught how to properly build fires so that they do not get out of hand. If they are taught how to put a camp fire out, it should be with materials that are available instead of with an extinguisher. Using an extinguisher would work better in an "urban" setting.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 4:44 am 
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I know, an extremely long post. I spent some time on this project. Here is what I came up with

Fire Safety Honor
  1. Have the Red Alert Honor
  2. Tour a fire station or invite a firefighter to give a talk to your club or school.
  3. Organize and conduct a fire drill at your school. Develop exit maps if needed.
  4. Complete all of the following:
    1. Know and understand the different classes of fires and the types of extinguishers needed to put them out.
    2. With a proper instructor, know how to use a fire extinguisher to put out a small fire.
    3. Know when to quit attempting to put a fire out and evacuate. In addition discus the reasons why keeping a clear exit is important.
    4. Inspect a minimum of five (5) fire extinguishers in your school, church, or other public building.
  5. Perform a fire safety inspection of your house and present your findings to your parents. Then perform a fire safety inspection of one of the following and present your findings to the leaders of the institution.
    1. Your church
    2. Your school
    * Be prepared to give suggestions and answer questions that arise.
  6. What precautions must you take before starting a camp or trash fire?
  7. Memorize the following Bible verses:
    1. Isaiah 43:2
    2. James 3:5, 6

Fire Safety Honor (Answers)
  1. Complete the Red Alert Honor before beginning this honor.
  2. Find a nearby fire station (which can be in the community, at an airport, or a Park/Forestry Service station) and arrange to have your group tour their facility or come speak to your group about what they do, how they do it, and maybe a story about a incident that could have been prevented.
  3. Work with your principle or superintendent on this requirement. They are often in charge of these activities and may already have a proper procedure. Ask to help them with one of the drills, explaining why. After the fire drill it would be a good idea to have them explain why they use the procedure that they used.

    Make maps for exit routes and post them throughout the school, if they are not already there. If they are already in place review them and have the principle or superintendent explain how they work.
  4. Complete all of the following:
    1. There are 5 different classes of fire. They are A, B, C, D, and K.
      1. Class A fires are fires with fuels that are normal combustibles. These include wood, clothing, etc. They can be extinguished many different ways. Common extinguishing methods are water. Extinguishers that can be used to extinguish Class A fires are A and ABC extinguishers.
      2. Class B fires are fires that involve fuels including oil, gas, kerosene, etc. These fires require more effort and much different methods to put them out. Common extinguishing methods are B and ABC extinguishers. However, if not available, any soil not soaked in the above liquids will do.
      3. Class C fires are fires that involved electricity. It can have any fuel. It is best to put this fire out by first shutting off the source of electricity. This turns the fire into either a Class A, B, or K fire, which can then be put out as prescribed for each class.

        If the power cannot be turned off for some reason. Use B, C, or ABC extinguishers. DO NOT USE WATER! YOU WILL BE ELECTROCUTED! After extinguishing the fire, you still have the issue of dangerous electrical current to deal with, along with the possibility of the fire reigniting. Call proper authorities immediately if the problem cannot be solved.
      4. Class D fires are combustible metals. These burn because of chemical interaction. An example of this would be sodium and water. Sodium reacts violently when water is introduced. Class D extinguishers vary for each combustible metal. If you have a combustible metal in a work environment, OSHA (in the United States) requires that you have the proper extinguishing agent on hand to deal with any combustion. Never use water to extinguish Class D fires. There are safer methods of extinguishing, such as Class D extinguishers.
      5. Class K fires are a newer classification used specifically for cooking oils. Water should not be used to extinguish Class K fires. Oil floats on top of water and the reacts violently with the cold water, splashing everywhere, thus spreading the fire beyond the original confines of a pot or pan. Class K extinguishers are available. However, often an extinguishing system is used instead of an extinguisher for Class K fires.
    2. The instructor should be certified or at least work in an area that utilizes fire extinguishers often (such as a inspector or firefighter). The fire should be no bigger than one (1) cubic foot in size and should be in a safe area (like an empty parking lot). The acronym used for teaching the use of a fire extinguisher is PASS.
      1. Pull the pin (sometimes a safety tab to keep the pin from falling out must be broken first).
      2. Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire.
      3. Squeeze the handle of the extinguisher to start spraying the extinguishing agent.
      4. Sweep the nozzle at the base of the fire until certain the fire is out.
    3. If the fire is not extinguished when the first extinguisher is used up, do not retrieve another extinguisher and try again. Evacuate yourself and any remaining individuals from the building. You should have already pulled a fire alarm (if there is one) the moment you were sure there was a fire.

      An escape route for yourself is extremely important to keep in mind when attempting to fight or extinguish a fire. If you become trapped while trying to be heroic, you have not helped emergency personnel. Instead, you have added to the things they must do. Now they have to find and try to save you as well as fight the fire.
    4. Have an inspector show you what to look for when inspecting a fire extinguisher. Then, either with the inspector or with another responsible adult, go around the building and check at least five (5) fire extinguishers in your school, church, or other public building.
  5. Have a person who does inspections explain how you should inspect your home and an industrial building. Ask them for things that they check for or maybe even a copy of the list that they use. Then either follow them on their inspection or with another adult inspect your church or school. You can be trusted to inspect your own house, though a parent and an inspector might help if you ask. When finished with your inspections, let your parents and the leaders of your church or school know what you found. If you have suggestions, now is the time to give them. Also be prepared to explain any issues and or questions that come up during your report.
  6. Clear a ten (10) foot area around the entire fire ground. Nothing should be in that ten-foot area. No trash, no leaves, no branches, and no contaminated earth. Let nothing that can burn be left in this area. Also have enough extinguishing agent nearby to completely extinguish the fire at its largest volume. (Others?)
  7. Memorize the following Bible verses:
    1. Isaiah 43:2
      1. “When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee.”
      -King James Version
    2. James 3:5, 6
      1. “Even so the tongue is a little member, and boasteth great things. Behold, how great a matter a little fire kindleth! And the tongue is a fire, a world of iniquity: so is the tongue among our members, that it defileth the whole body, and setteth on fire the course of nature; and it is set on fire of hell.”
        -King James Version

Firefighting Honor:
  1. Have the Fire Safety Honor
  2. What are the elements of the fire tetrahedron (newer than fire triangle)
  3. Explain the factors that influence wildfires and structural fires.
  4. What training must a person receive to become a certified firefighter in your community?
  5. Choose from the following options and list the protective gear used by one type of firefighter and describe the function of each piece of gear.
    1. Structural Firefighter
    2. Wildland Firefighter
    3. Proximity Firefighter (airport firefighting)
  6. Have a firefighter demonstrate or explain the use of the tools they use while on the job.
  7. As a group, construct a fire trail or, if not near the forest, a firebreak. This trail could also be used as a recreational trail.
  8. Understand the function of the following apparatus:
    1. Engine
    2. Ladder Truck
    3. Wagon or Tender (Tanker)
    4. Helicopter
    5. Retardant Aircraft
    6. Bulldozer
    7. Foam Truck
  9. Put out a small fire with available materials and also demonstrate protective measures to prevent spread of that fire.
  10. Discuss the role of a firefighter as it relates to Sabbath keeping.

Firefighting Honor Answers:
  1. Complete the Fire Safety Honor before beginning on this honor.
  2. Oxygen, Heat, Fuel, and Chemical reaction. Take away any one of these and you destroy a fire. (Before the Fire Tetrahedron was the Fire Triangle, which was just made up of Oxygen, Heat, and Fuel).
  3. Explain the factors that influence wildfires and structural fires.
    1. Wildfires are influenced by fuel (grasses and trees), weather (rain makes it harder for a fire to burn or spread), and topography (slopes or hills, plains, and soil).
    2. Structural fires are influenced by fuel (building construction materials) and availability of oxygen (inside a house).
  4. This will depend on the department, county, and/or state as to what training a person must have be become a certified firefighter. However, many require that you pass a NFPA 1001 course and applicable practical tests, as well as a probationary period, before becoming certified as a firefighter. The best way to find out is to ask your local firefighting agency.
  5. The pupil must choose one of the following types of firefighter. They must list and describe the function of each piece of equipment or clothing.
    1. Structural Firefighter
      1. Helmet
        • Protects the firefighter from falling debris as well as provide an added layer of protection against heat and flames.
        • Many helmets have face shields and ear/neck flaps for added protection.
      2. Hood
        • A thermal and fire resistant layer that is put on over the head, neck, and facemask.
      3. Coat
        • Covers the body from the waist up to the neck and from the wrists to the shoulders. It usually has 3 layers (fire resistant, thermal protection, and water proof). It protects against much of the debris, heat and some flames that a structural fire fighter encounters.
      4. Gloves
        • Covers the hands and wrists. Like the coat, it has layers (at least fire resistant and thermal protection layers). They keep firefighters from burning themselves and getting cut by much of the debris that they encounter.
      5. Pants
        • Like the coat, it has three layers and protects the firefighter the same ways.
      6. Boots
        • Can be made from a variety of materials, but always have the following in common. They protect against debris, some flames, and give traction in most environments.
      7. Facemask and Airpack (SCBA- Self Contained Breathing Apparatus)
        • The facemask is used to deliver clean air to the firefighter while they are in environments that it is not safe to breath in. It connects to the airpack that the firefighter carries on their backs. An airpack usually is said to last 30 minutes. However, firefighters don’t trust that number and are always checking to make sure that they have enough air.
      8. Flashlight
        • Many firefighters carry a flashlight with them on their coat. This can be used to give light when they cannot see.
    2. Wildland Firefighter
      1. Helmet
        • Protects the firefighter from falling debris as well as provide an added layer of protection against heat and flames.
        • Many helmets have face shields and ear/neck flaps for added protection.
      2. Coat
        • Lighter than the structural firefighter’s coat, this coat still provides some protection against fire and other obstructions found in the wilderness.
      3. Pants
        • Lighter than the structural firefighter’s pants, these pants still provide some protection against fire and other obstructions found in the wilderness.
      4. Gloves
        • Just like a structural firefighter’s gloves, these gloves provide protection against some flames and heat. In addition, many wildland firefighters carry work gloves to use when not near the fire. These don’t protect against heat and flames well, but are lighter and easier to work in when carrying/moving brush or operating machinery.
      5. Boots
        • Much like the structural firefighter’s boots, these boots protect against some flames and heat. Wildland firefighters usually choose boots that work better in the outdoor environment.
      6. Survival Shelter
        • Wildland firefighters often carry a lightweight shelter to protect themselves from the flames and heat in a wildland fire in case they cannot escape from the fire to safety. These shelters are like tents, but do not have any poles. They look somewhat like a huge piece of aluminum foil.
      7. (Did I miss anything? I was trying to keep to items used on their persons.)
    3. Proximity Firefighting
      1. Much of a proximity firefighter’s protective gear is the same as a structural firefighter’s with one exception. A proximity firefighter’s protective gear can withstand much greater heat, but is not as resistant to sharp objects and debris. Structural firefighter’s protective gear is often coated with gold and aluminum reflective material to reflect as much heat as possible away from the body to keep the firefighter cooler (The coating, just like the wildland firefighter’s survival shelter, looks a lot like aluminum foil). Also, proximity firefighter’s helmet covers there head more like a hood than a hard hat.
      2. (Again, did I miss anything? This is probably the area of firefighting I know the least about.)
  6. Go to a nearby fire station, and ask the firefighters to show or tell you about the tools that they use when fighting fires.
    1. Equipment that should be covered are axes, the hooligan bar, brush rakes, shovels, chain saws, hoes, and hose (I may have missed some items please let me know).
  7. A great way to do this is to contact the forestry service. They are usually happy to have help creating trails, with some advanced coordination. If not near the forest, a firebreak can be made. Always gain permission from the property owner before beginning a project.
  8. Understand the function of the following apparatus:
    1. Ladder Truck
      1. This truck is used to reach higher stories of buildings that may not be accessible to firefighters or to provide a shorter route for fighting a fire. Ladder trucks may also be used to spray water on a fire from above.
      2. This truck is great for rescuing people stranded in higher levels of buildings.
      3. Ladder trucks have not only ladders on the top of them, but they also bring extra ground ladders for firefighters to use when fighting fire.
    2. Wagon or Tender (Tanker)
      1. Wagons were often used to call a truck that carried much of the hose used to fight a fire. Tenders (sometimes called tankers) are trucks that have large tanks of water that can be used by pumpers and engines when water is not nearby. Today, wagons and tenders are often the same truck.
    3. Engine
      1. This truck is usually the first truck to arrive at a fire. It carries the firefighters, some hose, some water, and tools to begin fighting the fire. It also serves as the main vehicle for pumping water. Other trucks soon arrive to help the engine fight the fire.
      2. Sometimes an engine and pumper are the same truck.
    4. Helicopter
      1. Helicopters may be used to rescue people from hard to get to areas as well as look at the fire above to tell where it has spread. They even sometimes are used to take injured people to the hospital.
    5. Retardant Aircraft
      1. Retardant Aircraft (both planes and helicopters) carry water or other chemicals used to put fires out. They are often used to fight wildland fires.
    6. Bulldozer
      1. Bulldozers are used to create fire trails and firebreaks that are meant to be an area that has no fuel for the fire to burn, thus slowing or stopping its spread.
    7. Foam Truck
      1. These trucks are often used at airports. The have water and foam that they use to fight fires. They often spray the foam on burning planes or ground to extinguish the fire. Since foam does not conduct electricity, it can be used on many fires to smother the fire and sometimes stop the chemical reaction.
  9. Since you already learned how to put out a fire with an extinguisher in the Fire Safety Honor; this time you should try to put out a trash or brush fire (always controlled). You should try and put it out without an extinguisher. Try using dirt, rocks, or water. If you cannot extinguish it at first, start demonstrating the protective measures to prevent the spread of the fire. Then when confident that it cannot spread anywhere. Again try to extinguish it. You may have to let it burn out.
  10. (This is a difficult one. In Luke 14:1-6 says that Jesus healed on the Sabbath. Was that work? How much more is a human life worth than a single piece of cattle? I work on a volunteer department. I don’t go to the firehouse unless an alarm goes out over my pager. I am willing to help those in need, even though it is the Sabbath. However, I do not spend time just being at the firehouse on Sabbath. I find that the atmosphere, while everyone respects my beliefs, is not one that enhances my efforts to rest, praise, and contemplate the deeper meanings of Christ.)

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Last edited by tuningpeg571 on Fri Oct 02, 2009 8:01 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 4:55 am 
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veteranpathfinder,

I would like to help pilot this one. Regarding Firefighting Honor (#10) I agree with you, they are similar to doctors/nurses.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 6:09 am 
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Hey VP, that looks great! Thanks for all the work you put into it. I'd be happy to pilot it.

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Jim Thomas
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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 1:19 am 
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I certainly can't take all the credit. Everyone who contributed in posts above me helped write these honors. I just saved the thread as a web archive and tweaked/rewrote them to try to encompass everything without too much detail. If you all think they are ready, carry it forward.

I have a friend who is a firefighter in the USAF. Maybe he could review it and tell me if I missed anything (especially the proximity firefighting stuff). I would also like Mt. Home Trees to make sure I didn't miss anything on the wildland firefighting before piloting them.

If this is officailly written up, I think all of the following people should be credited for writing the honor.
    Jomegat
    betsyc
    veteranpathfinder
    harv4
    Mt. Home Trees
    wildernessfun
Each comment (however tiny) helped shape how I worded this honor. I don't know what to do with the honors now that they are written. Somebody help me with the rest of it. I think piloting is next. Yes? I have 2 takers that will be willing, after one more review with some other firefighting branches. Do I have another? Wildernessfun? Rider1000? I know you two want to do this. You've served on the department longer than I have...

I'll let you know about the review with my USAF friend shortly. Mt. Home Trees? I don't think this honor will be complete without your stamp of aproval from the wildland firefighting side.

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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 4:17 am 
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Hey VP,

Our conference Associate Pathfinder Director is also a fire fighter. I'll have him take a look too and see if he can get anyone else in our conference to pilot them.

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Jim Thomas
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 Post subject: Re: Firefighting Honor
PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 5:57 am 
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One modification I propose is to requirement 3 of the Fire Safety honor:
Quote:
3. Organize and conduct a fire drill at your school. Develop exit maps if needed.


In my club we have kids in six different schools. There's no way they are going to organize and conduct a fire drill at all six of them. I think it would be better if this activity could be accomplished under the direction of club staff, so here's what I suggest instead:

Quote:
3. Organize and conduct a fire drill at a school, church, or other public building. Develop exit maps if needed.


Proposed changes in red. This way, the drill could be conducted during a Pathfinder meeting.

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Jim Thomas
The sooner you get behind, the more time you have to catch up.


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